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Upcoming Events

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"Mysterious…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
You are invited to the Mysterious Wisterias Plantation for an evening of music… more

"Prospect.3: Notes…

Oct 31, 2014 - Jan 25, 2015
Prospect New Orleans, the International Contemporary Art Biennial,  will… more

16th Annual NNUAL…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
VOODOOFEST is our FREE annual festival, held EVERY Halloween, which celebrates… more

Andrew Jackson: Hero…

Oct 31, 2014 - Mar 29, 2015
THNOC's exhibition tracks Jackson's rise from humble beginnings to immortality… more

Anne Rice's Vampire…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
Join us for the 26th Annual Vampire Ball featuring Anne Rice  Lestat… more

Bucktober Fridays

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
Every Friday in October, Deanie's Seafood Restaurant delivers live music and… more

Crawloween at …

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium invites guests to celebrate Halloween… more

Fishbone +…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
Celebrating 25+ groundbreaking years, FISHBONE has been trailblazing their way… more

Friends of the…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
Friends of the Cabildo, support organization for the Louisiana State Museum,… more

Fright Night at the…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
Joinj us for Fright Night at the Carver. $500.00 Costume Contest Starring… more

Ghostly Galavant:…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
Join us for the  Eat, Drink,  and Be Scary Costume Party  set… more

Greater Baton Rouge…

Oct 31 - Nov 2, 2014
Carnival rides, food, music, kids' activities, animal shows, games, exhibits. more

JPAS Presents Waiting…

Oct 31 - Nov 2, 2014
JPAS presents the hit musical comedy all about working in the service industry,… more

K.L. Bone featured at…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
Combining her creative writing experience and advanced graduate education in… more

Maple Leaf Bar…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
Join us for live entertainment featuring Oteiloween! with lots of special guests more

New Orleans Halloween…

Oct 31 - Nov 1, 2014
If you thought that the only time of the year for great entertainment in New… more

NORDC Movies in the…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
NORDC Movies in the Park screening of "Space Jam" on Friday, October… more

Sacred to the Memory…

Oct 31 - Nov 17, 2014
Showcasing both the historic Hermann-Grima House museum and St. Louis Cemetery… more

Southern Rep presents…

Oct 31 - Nov 2, 2014
In a remote cabin deep in the woods, an old crone spins a spellbinding tale… more

The End is Near: The…

Oct 31 - Nov 1, 2014
The House of Shock Haunted House and Halloween Festival launches its final… more

"Mysterious…

Oct 31 - 31, 2014
You are invited to the Mysterious Wisterias Plantation for an evening of music… more

Hurricane Katrina – a Storm of Change

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contacts:

Larry Lovell or Andrew Nelson
Peter A. Mayer Public Relations
lovelll@peteramayer.com/ nelsona@peteramayer.com
504.210.1218 or 504.289.7713
504.210.1288 or 504.250.6303
Twitter: @larrylovell
Twitter: @andrewnelson

Hurricane Katrina – a Storm of Change
Five years after, Louisiana State Museum's riveting new exhibit
Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond
documents tragedy and rebirth

NEW ORLEANS (June 1, 2010) – Hurricane Katrina’s deluge was Biblical. When it hit Louisiana and Mississippi the morning of August 29, 2005, the storm caused fearsome destruction. Then the disaster grew worse. The levees – the man-made walls built to protect New Orleans from the water surrounding it – failed. Their collapse flooded 80 percent of the city. By the time the waters receded and the survivors regrouped, Katrina, and then Hurricane Rita, had claimed more than 1,400 lives and the dreams of hundreds of thousands.

“Hurricane Katrina was a watershed in American history,” says historian Doug Brinkley. “Never before did we watch the near total devastation of a major American city as it happened. The response and rebuilding challenged us as a nation. New Orleans and the Gulf Coast have come back renewed. The story of what happened five years ago must be remembered.”

On October 26, 2010, the Louisiana State Museum in New Orleans will remember the devastation and showcase the renewal with a new exhibit years in the making. Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond is a $7.5 million exhibit opening on the ground floor of the historic Presbytere in the French Quarter’s Jackson Square. The 6,700 square-foot installation tells the stories of real people caught in the hurricane’s wrath. It tells of their rescue, recovery, rebuilding and renewal in a way certain to move both those who survived the storms of 2005 and those who watched the events unfold on TV.

Combining eyewitness accounts, historical context, immersive environments and in-depth scientific exploration, Katrina and Beyond enables visitors to understand the 2005 storms’ impact on Louisiana, the Gulf Coast and the nation. It is a story of how a culture – the rich, variegated world of New Orleans and coastal Louisiana – has learned to live with the fragility of its environment and how the storms of 2005 gave rise to a new vision for the region.

Designed by the Boston-based firm ExperienceDesign that worked with the Museum’s historians, curators and exhibit designers, Living with Hurricanes consists of a powerful and moving series of galleries – each telling one aspect of the story using artifacts and rich media – sound, video and computer graphics.

“Museums have become places for interactive learning,” says Museum Director Sam Rykels. “The galleries in Living with Hurricanes are designed to convey what happened to visitors of all ages and all backgrounds incorporating everything from survivors’ personal mementos to their thoughts and feelings.”

Gallery One illustrates Louisiana’s history with water, from the Mississippi River’s benefits to the threats of coastal storm surges and floods. Visitors will move through the “Evacuation Corridor,” overhearing residents’ voices as they weigh their options as Katrina approaches. A state of the art “Storm Theater” shows Katrina’s full fury with moving and dramatic footage of the hurricane’s onslaught.

Gallery Two takes visitors past a leaking floodwall and into an attic and onto a roof where they can view the flooded city surrounding them. They’ll hear a firsthand account of a St. Bernard Parish family’s rescue and view artifacts, histories and photographs.

Throughout the galleries are compelling artifacts ranging from music legend Fats Domino’s baby grand piano found in his flooded Ninth Ward house to a Coast Guard rescue basket to seats from the Louisiana Superdome. The objects serve as touchstones in recalling the days after the storm.

The forensics of Katrina unfold in Gallery Three where science and innovative displays come together. A large interactive table map shows the paths of Katrina and Rita and the sequence of floods that inundated the region. Visitors discover how the levees failed with digital animation. Additional displays illustrate the realities of eroding wetlands, disaster management, engineering and the science of predicting and tracking hurricanes.

The Fourth Gallery celebrates recovery and promotes preparedness, showcases the ingenuity of Louisianans in rebuilding their lives and communities. The gallery will be updated regularly to reflect advancements in flood protection and coastal restoration and new strategies for living with hurricanes.

“Visitors will leave knowing the power of hope,” says Louisiana Lt. Governor Scott Angelle. “Even in the darkest hours just after the storm Louisianans were already drawing up plans to make their home a better place than it was before. Now, five years after, there’s a true rebirth in our state.”

Major partners in Living with Hurricanes include the universities of Rhode Island, Tulane and Xavier. Major donors include The National Science Foundation, W.R. Irby Trust, RosaMary Foundation, The Booth-Bricker Fund, Ella West Freeman Foundation, Selley Fund, Goldring Family Foundation, Woldenberg Foundation, National Park Service, The Government of the Netherlands, the Darryl Berger Company, The Foundation for the Mid South and The National Geographic Foundation.

Founded in 1906 with a mission to collect, preserve, interpret and present the state’s rich history and diverse cultures, the Louisiana State Museum’s collection now totals more than 450,000 artifacts and works of art. These provide an authentic experience of Louisiana to visitors from around the world while enhancing the quality of life for residents. The Museum is part of the Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism.

The exhibit will be located at The Presbytere on Jackson Square, New Orleans. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. For more information, please call 800.568.6968 or visit http://www.KatrinaAndBeyond.com, on Facebook and Twitter.

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