Traditional Foods


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Art is the Driving…

Dec 7 - 30, 2016
Art has a power that reaches beyond personal visual expression. This exhibition… more

Ashe Cultural Arts…

Dec 7 - 7, 2016
"The Origin of Life on Earth: An African Creation Myth" that tells… more

Celebration in the…

Dec 07, 2016 - Jan 01, 2017
City Park's annual holiday lighting exhibit and festival returns with one of… more

Christmas New Orleans…

Dec 7 - 31, 2016
There's no place like New Orleans for the holidays during Christmas New Orleans… more

Clarence John…

Dec 07, 2016 - Mar 25, 2017
A Louisiana native, Clarence John Laughlin (1905 - 1985) ranks among the most… more

Comedy Gold hosted by…

Dec 07, 2016 - Jan 07, 2026
In The Voodoo Garden, All Ages (content may not be appropriate for all ages).… more

David Hansen's Garden…

Dec 07, 2016
Since 2006, Hansen's Garden District Jazz Trio has performed every night at… more

Dean's List

Dec 7 - 28, 2016
Dean's List is a variety show of a most unusual kind. This show blends improv,… more

Exhibition to feature…

Dec 07, 2016 - Mar 25, 2017
 The Historic New Orleans Collection will open its next exhibition,… more

Grease Trio: Terence…

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Happy's Running Club…

Dec 7 - 28, 2016
Join us every Wednesday  for a  fun 5k or close at the Happy's Irish… more

Historic New Orleans…

Dec 07, 2016 - Apr 09, 2017
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Holiday Home and…

Dec 7 - 31, 2016
Just in time for the holiday season, The Historic New Orleans Collection will… more

Jonathan Weiss Dark…

Dec 7 - 31, 2016
Tour company Jonathan Weiss Tours will donate 15% of proceeds during the month… more

Luna Fete: 2016

Dec 7 - 10, 2016
    LUNA (Light Up NOLA Arts) Fete returns this December to… more

Miracle on Fulton…

Dec 7 - 24, 2016
NOV 22 – DEC 24 Hourly Snowfall 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Gingerbread… more

Napoléon: General.…

Dec 07, 2016 - Jan 07, 2017
M.S. Rau Antiques will host a comprehensive exhibition Napoléon:… more

Newcomb Art Museum -…

Dec 7 - 30, 2016
Featuring work by nine women artists from the island continent, this exhibition… more

Oscar and The Blues…

Dec 7 - 28, 2016
This bands plays Blues music, which guest musicians will sit in and play with… more

Saenger Theatre…

Dec 7 - 7, 2016
One of the biggest icons in American music, Tony Bennett, comes to the Saenger… more

Art is the Driving…

Dec 7 - 30, 2016
Art has a power that reaches beyond personal visual expression. This exhibition… more
Guidebook

Traditional New Orleans Foods

If you end up at some boring chain restaurant eating bland hamburgers while you're in New Orleans, we'll simply never forgive you. More importantly, you'll never forgive yourself. Avoid such shame by familiarizing yourself with the dishes below and be well prepared to savor forkfuls of the culture, tradition and recipe perfection that have earned New Orleans its culinary legacy.

Gumbo

GumboA trip to New Orleans is not complete without a steamy helping of gumbo. Treat yourself to a culinary carnival created with a mix of West European, African, Caribbean and Native American influences.

Classic gumbo recipes call for okra simmered for hours in a roux, a dark stock made from either butter or oil and flour, with a variety of meats, onions, celery and bell peppers. Served over rice, variations include seafood gumbo with shrimp, oysters and crabmeat or chicken gumbo with andouille sausage.

Jambalaya

A meal in itself, this classic New Orleans dish consists of sausage, vegetables and a variety of meats and/or seafood. The final touch - adding raw long-grain rice to absorb flavors from the stock - is what sets this one-pot wonder apart from similar ethnic dishes. Variations can include chicken, turkey shrimp, alligator meat and more. Consider it a New Orleans version of paella.

Andouille

This spiced, heavily smoked pork sausage is a key flavor in many New Orleans dishes. Originally brought to Louisiana by French colonists, today's Cajun andouille is the best-known variety in the U.S. - and the spiciest. The sausage is seasoned with salt, cracked black pepper and garlic and is smoked over pecan wood and sugar cane for up to eight hours. Andouille can be found in gumbo, jambalaya, on a po boy and served along side red beans and rice.

Crawfish Étouffée

A local favorite, crawfish étouffée could be called gumbo's spiced-up cousin. Stemming from the French word for "smothered," this thick Cajun creation employs hot spices including cayenne pepper, a mélange of onion and green pepper and hints of garlic. With loads of fresh crawfish, this tantalizing Southern treat is typically enjoyed over rice.

Shrimp Creole

As time-honored as shrimping is to Louisiana, this coveted culinary delight offers fresh peeled shrimp, chopped onion, green pepper, green onion and chopped tomato. Satisfy your Southern spice craving while keeping the calorie factor low - this tomato-based favorite is a healthy, light and flavorful Creole dish.

Muffuletta Muffaletta

Stuffed with classically Italian flavors such as salami, ham, provolone and the piquant olive spread that gives it its distinctive taste, this famous sandwich was born in New Orleans. Restaurants all over the city have their own versions, but for a taste of the original, visit Central Grocery, which invented the sandwich in 1903.

poboyfestgoldbarPo-boy

There are many variations of this classic New Orleans sandwich, as well as a few different stories about its origins. A couple of commonalities across all interpretations: long, baguette-style French bread and an affordable price. Po-boys usually are piled high with meat such as roast beef and debris (a tasty version of gravy), turkey or smoked sausage. They can also be filled with fried seafood such as shrimp, catfish or oysters mixed with a specialty white sauce that is a more flavorful version of tartar sauce. If your waitress asks if you want your poboy "dressed," say yes - po-boys are always better with lettuce, tomatoes, pickles and mayonnaise.

Red Beans and RiceRed Beans and Rice

This Creole classic is a staple on menus across the city, and many restaurants feature it on Mondays - that's because New Orleanians traditionally made the dish with leftover pork from Sunday dinner and could leave the beans to cook all day while they tended to their washing. Red beans can be served with a side of sausage, pork chops or fried chicken.

Oysters Rockefeller

Oysters Rockefeller can be ordered all over the city, but the New Orleans institution Antoine's holds the title of creator, serving the original dish since 1899. Though the exact recipe remains a secret, chefs describe the dish as oysters on the half shell topped with a combination of capers, parsley and parmesan cheese and topped with a rich white sauce of butter, flour and milk - all broiled to perfection.

Bread Pudding

What began as a creative way to use stale French bread has progressed into a popular closing course and New Orleans menu mainstay. Soaked in milk, eggs and sugar, the bread is baked and topped with a sweet, typically bourbon-based sauce. Local chefs put their own spin on the rich dish, adding white chocolate, candied pecans or chantilly cream with lemon.

Bananas FosterBananas Foster Brennans

This distinctive dessert - made with bananas, ice cream, dark rum, sugar and spices - was famously invented at Brennan's Restaurant right here in New Orleans. The flambeed treat remains Brennan's most popular item, requiring 35,000 pounds of bananas each year!

beignetBeignets

Sometimes called a "French doughnut," these decadent treats were brought to Louisiana by the Acadians. A beignet is a square piece of dough that, upon being deep fried, forms a crispy pillow with a doughy interior. Most often, they are covered with powdered sugar, but savory versions with fillings such as crawfish or shrimp are also seen on New Orleans menus and are served as appetizers.

Creole Pralines

These sweet confections date back to 17th century France. The chef of a French diplomat created a recipe for sugar coating almonds that is said to have been used a digestive aid. When the sweet treat made its way to the states, the singular almond was replaced by a handful of the local nut, pecans. Today, variations on the praline can be found in a variety of flavors, with hot Tabasco sauce or added cream for a chewier treat.

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