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"Organ & Labyrinth"-…

Apr 25 - 25, 2017
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'the dislocation of…

Apr 25 - 27, 2017
exhibition dates: April 8 - 29, 2017 gallery hours: every Tuesday &… more

“Giants of Jazz: Art…

Apr 25 - Dec 17, 2017
This spring, art and music converge as The Historic New Orleans Collection… more

Ashe Cultural Arts…

Apr 25 - 25, 2017
The Congo Square Preservation Society, in partnership with Ashé, invites… more

Cecilia Vicuña: About…

Apr 25 - Jun 18, 2017
Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen traces the artist’s long career to… more

David Hansen's Garden…

Apr 25, 2017
Since 2006, Hansen's Garden District Jazz Trio has performed every night at… more

Earth Day

Apr 25 - 25, 2017
Earth Day at the New Orleans Botanical Garden promises to be a great event!… more

New Orleans Museum of…

Apr 25 - May 21, 2017
NOMA is organizing A Life of Seduction: Venice in the 1700s in cooperation… more

New Orleans Museum of…

Apr 25 - Oct 8, 2017
Jim Steg (American, 1922 -2001) was the most influential printmaker to be based… more

New Orleans Museum of…

Apr 25 - Oct 1, 2017
In celebration of beloved chef, civil rights activist, and art collector Leah… more

New Orleans Museum of…

Apr 25 - Oct 8, 2017
Paintings from throughout Scully's career are presented with a selection of… more

Senga Nengudi:…

Apr 25 - Jun 18, 2017
In 1975, artist Senga Nengudi began a series of sculptures, entitled R.S.V.P.,… more

Singer/Songerwriter…

Apr 25, 2017 - Jan 06, 2026
In The Voodoo Garden, All Ages. House of Blues New Orleans hosts a new weekly… more

Tennessee Williams -…

Apr 25 - May 16, 2017
Experience SWEET BIRD OF YOUTH, a decadent fever dream by Tennessee Williams! … more

The All-Star…

Apr 25 - May 30, 2017
The only Classic Americana show of its kind in New Orleans, each week featuring… more

The Georgian…

Apr 25 - Oct 16, 2017
For more than a century, a King George sat on the British throne. The Georgian… more

Zurich Classic

Apr 25 - 30, 2017
Golf fans will have a chance to support regional children's charities while… more

Beyond the Canvas:…

Apr 26 - 26, 2017
In conjunction with Beyond the Canvas: Contemporary Art from Puerto Rico,… more

Beyond the Canvas:…

Apr 26 - Jul 9, 2017
Spanning several generations, five Puerto Rico-based artists Zilia… more

Chicken on the Bone…

Apr 26 - Dec 6, 2017
Want to enjoy some nightlife? No trip to New Orleans is complete if you have… more

"Organ & Labyrinth"-…

Apr 25 - 25, 2017
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Architecture & Culture

Bayou St. John

Architectural Vignettes

New Orleans, with its richly mottled old buildings, its sly, sophisticated - sometimes almost disreputable - air, and its Hispanic-Gallic traditions, has more the flavor of an old European capital than an American city. Townhouses in the French Quarter, with their courtyards and carriageways, are thought by some scholars to be related on a small scale to certain Parisian "hotels" - princely urban residences of the 17th and 18th centuries. Visitors particularly remember the decorative cast-iron balconies that cover many of these townhouses like ornamental filigree cages.

European influence is also seen in the city's famous above-ground cemeteries. The practice of interring people in large, richly adorned aboveground tombs dates from the period when New Orleans was under Spanish rule. These hugely popular "cities of the dead" have been and continue to be an item of great interest to visitors. Mark Twain, noting that New Orleanians did not have conventional below-ground burials, quipped that "few of the living complain and none of the other."

French Quarter Balcony

One of the truly amazing aspects of New Orleans architecture is the sheer number of historic homes and buildings per square mile. Orleanians never seem to replace anything. Consider this: Uptown, the City's largest historic district, has almost 11,000 buildings, 82 percent of which were built before 1935 - truly a "time warp."

The spine of Uptown, and much of New Orleans, is the city's grand residential showcase, St. Charles Avenue, which the novel A Confederacy of Dunces aptly describes: "The ancient oaks of St. Charles Avenue arched over the avenue like a canopy...St. Charles Avenue must be the loveliest place in the world. From time to time...passed the slowing rocking streetcars that seemed to be leisurely moving toward no special designations, following their route through the old mansions on either side...everything looked so calm, so prosperous."

The streetcars in question, the St. Charles Avenue line, represent the nation's only surviving historic streetcar system. All of its electric cars were manufactured by the Perley Thomas Company between 1922 and 1924 and are still in use. Hurricane Katrina flood waters caused severe damage to the steel tracks along the entire uptown and Carrollton route and had to be totally replaced and re-electrified. The cars themselves survived and are included in the National Register of Historic Places. New Orleanians revere them as a national treasure.

Unique Housing for a Unique City 

Creole cottages and shotgun houses dominate the scene in many New Orleans neighborhoods. Both have a murky ancestry. The Creole cottage, two rooms wide and two or more deep under a generous pitched roof with a front overhang or gallery, is thought to have evolved from various European and Caribbean forms.

The shotgun house is one room wide and two, three or four rooms deep, under a continuous gable roof. As legend has it, the name was suggested by the fact that because the rooms and doors line up, one can fire a shotgun through the house without hitting anything.

French Quarter Balcony 2 250x250

Some scholars have suggested that shotguns evolved from ancient African "long-houses," built here by refugees from the Haitian Revolution, but no one really knows.

It is true that shotguns represent a distinctively Southern house type. They are also found in the form of plantation quarters houses. Unlike shotgun houses in much of the South, which are fairly plain, New Orleans shotguns fairly bristle with Victorian jigsaw ornament, especially prominent, florid brackets. Indeed, in many ways, New Orleans shotguns are as much a signature of the city as the French Quarter.

New Orleans' architectural character is unlike that of any other American city. A delight to both natives and visitors, it presents such a variety that even after many years of study, one can still find things unique and undiscovered.

This material may be reproduced for editorial purposes of promoting New Orleans. Please attribute stories to New Orleans Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau. 2020 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70130 504-566-5019. http://www.neworleanscvb.com/.