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14th Annual Saints…

Mar 25 - 26, 2017
Join us for the 14th annual Saints and Sinners Literary Festival. The festival… more

19th Annual…

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
Travel the world in a single day at the 19th Annual Children's World's Fair -… more

Bach Around the Clock

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
Come join us for the Annual Bach Around the Clock. There will be over two… more

Backyard Grooves

Mar 25, 2017 - Jan 10, 2026
In The Voodoo Garden, All Ages.   more

Cecilia Vicuña: About…

Mar 25 - Jun 18, 2017
Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen traces the artist’s long career to… more

Clarence John…

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
A Louisiana native, Clarence John Laughlin (1905 - 1985) ranks among the most… more

Dividing the Estate

Mar 25 - Apr 15, 2017
The third regional premiere of our season is the winner of the Outer Critics… more

Double Dose

Mar 25, 2017 - Jan 10, 2026
ActionActionReaction and friends keep the dance floor energized with mixes of… more

Drafts for Crafts -…

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
Joinus for the official launch party of PT-305. After nearly a decade of… more

Exhibition to feature…

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
 The Historic New Orleans Collection will open its next exhibition,… more

Louisiana Children's…

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
Travel the world in a single day at the 19th Annual Children's World's Fair -… more

Louisiana Music…

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
Join us for some live music featuring Alfred Banks. more

Louisiana Music…

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
Join us for some live music featuring Black Laurel. more

Louisiana Music…

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
Join us for some live music featuring Extended Trio. more

New Orleans Bourbon…

Mar 25 - 26, 2017
Laissez les bon temps rouler. Let the good times roll. The motto of a city that… more

New Orleans…

Mar 25 - 26, 2017
Come join us in a spring celebration featuring sugar blowing demonstrations and… more

New Orleans Mission…

Mar 25 - 25, 2017
The New Orleans Mission will host Cruisin' for the Mission, a one-day event… more

New Orleans Museum of…

Mar 25 - May 21, 2017
NOMA is organizing A Life of Seduction: Venice in the 1700s in cooperation… more

New Orleans Museum of…

Mar 25 - Oct 1, 2017
In celebration of beloved chef, civil rights activist, and art collector Leah… more

New Orleans Spring…

Mar 25 - Apr 2, 2017
New Orleans Spring Fiesta Association celebrates the cultural heritage… more

14th Annual Saints…

Mar 25 - 26, 2017
Join us for the 14th annual Saints and Sinners Literary Festival. The festival… more

New Orleans History

History

The history of New Orleans reads like a fantastic novel. Here are a few of the highlights to help you better understand the historical dynamics that have shaped this utterly unique city.

French Founders: 1718

In 1718, the Frenchman Sieur de Bienville founded a strategic port city five feet below sea level, near the juncture of the Mississippi and the Gulf of Mexico. The new city, or ville, was named La nouvelle Orleans for Philippe, Duc d'Orleans, and centered around the Place d'Armes (later to be known as Jackson Square). The original city was confined to the area we now call the French Quarter or Vieux Carre (Old Square).

Spanish Rule: 1762-1801

In 1762, either because he lost a bet or because the royal coffers were exhausted, Louis XV gave Louisiana to his Spanish cousin, King Charles III. Spanish rule was relatively short -- lasting until 1801 -- but Spain would leave a lasting imprint on the city.

In 1788, the city went up in flames, incinerating over 800 buildings. New Orleans was still recovering when a second fire in 1794 destroyed 200 structures. One of the only French structures to survive these fires is the Old Ursuline Convent (1100 Chartres). Completed in 1752, it is the oldest building in the Mississippi River Valley. This means that most of the buildings you see in the French Quarter were actually constructed by the Spanish and feature distinctly Spanish architectural elements.

Louisiana Purchase: 1803

In 1801 Louisiana ceded back to France, but only two years later Napoleon sold the territory to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, effectively doubling the size of the U.S.A. At a cost of only $15 million, it was considered one of the greatest real estate bargains in history.

The American Sector and Haitian Immigration

After the Louisiana Purchase, Americans arrived en masse as did European immigrants from Germany, Ireland and Sicily.

Tension existed between the European Creoles concentrated in the French Quarter and the new American residents. As a result, the Americans settled across Canal Street in what was known then as the American Sector, known today as The Central Business District. The two factions skirmished often, and the Canal Street median became a neutral area where the two groups could come together to do business without invading the other's territory. Ever since, all city medians have been called neutral grounds.

And the Haitian Revolution of 1804 meant that for years to come thousands of Afro-Caribbean descent would come to call New Orleans home. These immigrants further diversified the population of New Orleans and made colorful contributions to the city's culture.

The War of 1812 and The Battle of New Orleans

The war of 1812 culminated in the Battle of New Orleans three years after the war began. In January of 1815, 8,000 British troops were poised to attack and overtake the City of New Orleans. The American forces lead by General Andrew Jackson were grossly outnumbered. Due to the circumstances an unusual union formed - the notorious pirate Jean Lafitte and his men joined the American forces to defend New Orleans. On January 8, a polyglot band of 4,000 militia, frontiersmen, former Haitian slaves and Lafitte's pirates defeated the British at  Chalmette Battlefield, just a few miles east of the French Quarter. The battlefield remains a place worthy of a visit.

The New Paris

By the mid-1800s, the city in the bend of the river became the fourth largest in the U.S. and one of the richest, dazzling visitors with chic Parisian couture, fabulous restaurants and sophisticated culture.

Society centered around the French Opera House, where professional opera and theatre companies played to full houses. In fact, opera was performed in New Orleans seven years before the Louisiana Purchase, and more than 400 operas premiered in the Crescent City during the l9th century.

A Cultural Gumbo

Under French, Spanish and American flags, Creole society coalesced as Islanders, West Africans, slaves, free people of color and indentured servants poured into the city along with a mix of French and Spanish aristocrats, merchants, farmers, soldiers, freed prisoners and nuns.

New Orleans was, for its time, a permissive society that resulted an intermingling of peoples unseen in other communities, and it is New Orleans' diverse heritage that is the driving force behind this unique and exotic city. The contributions of Africans, Caribbean peoples, the French, Spanish, Germans, Irish, Sicilians and more created a society unlike any other.

Over the years New Orleans has had a powerful influence on American and global culture. Our cuisine is known across the world and rock and roll was born from the sounds of our sultry jazz. Literary giants from Tennessee Williams to William Faulkner have flocked to the city for inspiration. Our food, music and cultural practices will capture your imagination and your heart. Diversity, creativity and celebration are at the core of the New Orleans way of life. All are welcome - the more ingredients, the more we can feed.

For more information on New Orleans history visit one of our many museums or take a tour with one of our knowledgeable guides.