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Upcoming Events

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Adventures in Dance…

Jul 24 - 25, 2014
WHO: In partnership with the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission,… more

Anthony Bean…

Jul 24 - 27, 2014
The Anthony Bean Community Theater/NORDC Summer Youth Program presents over 75… more

Entergy IMAX Theatre…

Jul 24 - Aug 21, 2014
Entergy IMAX Theatre and 3D Entertainment Distribution invite audiences on an… more

JPAS Summer Musical…

Jul 24 - Aug 3, 2014
  THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE JR., based on the zany musical that has taken… more

Ogden After Hours-…

Jul 24 - 24, 2014
Ogden After Hours is the place to go on Thursday nights to to hear Southern… more

Open Mic Night at…

Jul 24 - Aug 28, 2014
This summer, Thursday nights at Hard Rock New Orleans are open to local… more

"Toasts & Tiki-Tails"

Jul 25 - 25, 2014
"Toasts & Tiki-Tails" will be held at the NO Fleas Market during… more

2014 Youth Musical…

Jul 25 - 27, 2014
SEUSSICAL JR. Transports audiences from the Jungle of Nool to the Circus… more

AMERICAN IDOL LIVE…

Jul 25 - 25, 2014
Fans of the hit series can see this season's talented Top Ten Finalists live… more

Bricks in the Wall -…

Jul 25 - 25, 2014
The most spectacular, mind blowing & longest performing Pink Floyd Tribute… more

Le Petit Theatre…

Jul 25 - 25, 2014
- Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carré will present an encore production of… more

New Orleans Museum of…

Jul 25 - 25, 2014
Chefs of the Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group look forward to demonstrating their… more

PINTS & PLAYS

Jul 25 - Nov 25, 2014
PINTS & PLAYS is a monthly play reading in the true spirit of New Orleans. … more

Steinbeck: The Art of…

Jul 25 - 25, 2014
An opening reception for Steinbeck: The Art of Fiction will be held from 6 to 9… more

Avita's World…

Jul 26 - 26, 2014
World Hepatitis Day is part of Avita's campaign to rase awareness about… more

Jump, Jive & Wail:…

Jul 26 - 27, 2014
The Stage Door Canteen's Big Easy award winning hit show Jump, Jive & Wail… more

Le Petit Theatre…

Jul 26 - 26, 2014
- Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carré will present an encore production of… more

Neighborhood Pet…

Jul 26 - 26, 2014
Neighborhood Pet Adoption & Bake Sale, sponsored by the LA/SPCA will be… more

The Historic New…

Jul 26 - 26, 2014
Join us for a screening of "Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte" (1964),… more

Theater Nuts and Bolts

Jul 26 - 26, 2014
Theatre Nuts And Bolts is a two hour workshop that offers the basics of… more

Adventures in Dance…

Jul 24 - 25, 2014
WHO: In partnership with the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission,… more

Sound Like a Local

New Orleans'unique culture comes with a language all its own. Explore below for a crashcourse in NOLA speak. 

  • NOLA: Short for- New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Banquette: Sidewalk.
  • Bayou: Choctaw for "small stream." It's a creek with a slow current, flowing from a river or lowland lake, often through swamp areas, usually in a delta region. Amongits many nicknames, Louisiana is called "The Bayou State" for its beautiful wetland regions.
  • Cajun: Nickname for Acadians, the French-speaking people who migrated to Louisiana from Nova Scotia, starting in 1755.
  • Cities of the Dead: New Orleans cemeteries. Because of the high water table, we spend the afterlife buried above ground instead of six feet under it. Elaborate monuments cluster together like small communities.
  • Directions: There is no West, East, North, or South in New Orleans. We head uptown, downtown, lakeside and riverside. And anywhere the music is.
  • Fais-do-do (fay-doe-doe): It means, "Put the kids to sleep." And party hearty. In the old days, when Cajuns would celebrate, they brought the kids with their blankies so the little ones could snooze while adults would eat, drink, and dance their way through the night.
  • Faubourg (foe-burg): As in "Faubourg Marigny." Originally suburbs, they are now neighborhoods near the French Quarter. (The Vieux Carré once defined the entire city of New Orleans.)
  • Gris-gris (gree-gree): "X" marks the spot. Voodoo spells, often indicated by Xs, are still found on tombs like that of legendary voodoo queen Marie Laveau.
  • Gumbo ya-ya: "Everybody talking at once."
  • Isleños (iz-lay-nyos): Islanders; in this case, Spanish settlers from the Canary Islands. Since 1799, they've been fishermen, trappers, and master boat builders in Louisiana. You can find them downriver, in St. Bernard Parish.
  • Jazz: Louis Armstrong said, "If you gotta ask, you'll never know." So much for a definition. As for origin, some say it was a New Orleans barber named Buddy Bolden, who in 1891 blew a few hot notes with his cornet and invented a new form of music that's been an American favorite since the Jazz Age of the ‘20s. Jazz mixes African and Creole rhythms with European styles. Surprisingly, the Irish, Germans, and Italians contributed the brass bands.
  • Krewe: Members of a carnival organization, as in Krewe of Rex. A variation of "crew," the word was invented by 19th-century New Orleanians, who privately bankrolled the balls and parades (as is still the case).
  • Lagniappe (lan-yap): A little something extra. A free coffee or dessert or a few extra ounces of boudin put the "bons" in "bons temps."
  • Laissez les bons temps rouler! (less-say lay bon tonh roo-lay): Let the good times roll.
  • Makin' groceries: Shopping for groceries. What you do before whipping up some gumbo.
  • Neutral ground: When the Americans arrived in New Orleans after the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, Europeans and Creoles who inhabited the French Quarter (then, the entire city of New Orleans) considered them unwelcome interlopers. So the immigrants settled across Canal Street and established what is now the Central Business and Arts District. Canal Street became the "neutral ground" in the clash of cultures. Ever since, New Orleans has been a city sans medians. Here, we have only neutral grounds. In case you're wondering, cars parked on the raised neutral grounds mean only two things: nearby parades or a forecast of rain.
  • New Orleans: Pronounced noo aw-lins or new or-lins or new or-lee-yuns, but not new orleens. Unless referring to the street or the parish of or-leens. Or when you're singing. Confused yet?
  • Parish: Equivalent of a county in the other 49 states.
  • Pass a good time: Live it up.
  • Picayune: Old Spanish coin, 1/8 of a dollar. Connotes something really small or petty.
  • Pirogue: Shallow canoe used in the bayous.
  • Pro bono publico: "For the common good," motto of Rex, King of Carnival.
  • Secondline: The people who follow a brass band on the street while swinging a handkerchief in a circle over their heads. These second-liners also have a special shuffle step or dance they do when following the band commonly referred to as "buck jumping" or "secondlining."
  • Streetcar: New Orleans' name for the world's oldest continuously operating electric street railway. In 1835, a steam engine train ran from the Vieux Carré along St. Charles to the outlying town of Carrollton (now the Uptown Riverbend area). In the 1860s, the route became a horse-and mule-drawn line, and went electric in 1893.
  • Street Names: We've got some strange pronunciation. A sample:
    • Burgundy (bur-gun-dee)
    • Conti (con-tie)
    • Calliope (kal-ee-ope)
    • Melpomene (mel-puh-meen)
    • Tchoupitoulas (chop-ih-too-liss)
    • Clio (clee-oh) but often completely misread as C-L 10. Honest.
  • Swamp: A low, marshy wetland, heavily forested and subject to seasonal flooding.
  • Vieux Carré (vyeuh kah-ray): Literally, "Old Square" or "Old Quarter," it refers to the French Quarter. Before it was "Old," "French," or a "Quarter" of any kind, the area was just the "Ville," the entire city of New Orleans. Today, its 90 city blocks hold about 2,700 European and Creole-style buildings, most with a long and fascinating history.
  • Voodoo: From voudun, meaning "god," "spirit," or "insight" in the Fon language of Dahomey. Voodoo came from the West African Yoruba religion via Haiti, where African practices mingled with the Catholicism of French colonists.
  • Yat: A local denizen. Named for the Ninth Ward greeting, "Where y'at?"