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Upcoming Events

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COOLinary New…

Aug 20 - 31, 2014
It is going to be a delicious summer!  Throughout the whole month of… more

Entergy IMAX Theatre…

Aug 20 - 21, 2014
Entergy IMAX Theatre and 3D Entertainment Distribution invite audiences on an… more

Lunchbox Lecture -…

Aug 20 - 20, 2014
In July 1944, after six weeks of bitter fighting in the bocage country of… more

Maple Leaf Bar…

Aug 20 - 20, 2014
Join us for Slide Hellions Featuring Colin Lake, John Fohl, and Brint… more

Mark of the Feminine

Aug 20 - Oct 4, 2014
Curator Regine Basha's Mark of the Feminine is the first in a series of… more

True Colors Exhibition

Aug 20 - 29, 2014
This exhibition aims to represent people of all sexualities, genders, races and… more

White Glove Wednesdays

Aug 20 - 20, 2014
It's one thing to read on an exhibit label that an infantryman's pack in World… more

Harrah’s New Orleans…

Aug 21 - 21, 2014
Harrah's New Orleans proudly celebrates the local sounds of the city by… more

Johnny Vidacovich,…

Aug 21 - 21, 2014
Join us for  live Jazz featuring  Johnny Vidacovich, Nicholas Payton,… more

Joy Theater Presents…

Aug 21 - 21, 2014
Please come and enjoy live music performance at 9:30 pm along with these fun… more

Lakefront Arena…

Aug 21 - 21, 2014
Get ready New Orleans as One Republic arrives at the Lakefront Arena! Guests… more

Open Mic Night at…

Aug 21 - 28, 2014
This summer, Thursday nights at Hard Rock New Orleans are open to local… more

Bustout Burlesque

Aug 22 - 22, 2014
Bustout Burlesque is an authentic 1950s-style burlesque show, recreating the… more

Crescent City Lights…

Aug 22 - 24, 2014
The Crescent City Lights Youth Theater summer season (in partnership with… more

Maple Leaf Bar…

Aug 22 - 22, 2014
Join us for live entertainment featuring Groovesect. more

New Orleans Museum of…

Aug 22 - 22, 2014
Chefs of the Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group look forward to demonstrating their… more

28th Annual…

Aug 23 - 23, 2014
Join us for the 28th Annual Mid Summer Mardi Gras. Presented by the Krewe of… more

Abita Springs Opry at…

Aug 23 - 30, 2014
Two bands - Three Hours - Five Saturdays First band plays approx 12 noon… more

Abita Springs Opry in…

Aug 23 - 30, 2014
Join us every Saturday in August for The Abita Springs Opry concert… more

Blazin10 Presents A…

Aug 23 - 23, 2014
Join us for a Trunk Show Featuring Kano Branon - (Designer & Stylist of… more

COOLinary New…

Aug 20 - 31, 2014
It is going to be a delicious summer!  Throughout the whole month of… more

Architecture

How to Sound Like an Architecture Expert in New Orleans

Say you're strolling through New Orleans discussing with your companions the merits of beignets over donuts, and there to the left is a stunning example of traditional Southern building design. Rather than risk mistaking a classic American townhouse for a Creole townhouse, take a few notes from our Crescent City architecture primer and demonstrate your architectural expertise.

Creole Cottage

Where you'll see it: French Quarter. You can recognize the signature single-story homes by the steeply pitched roofs and front porches that practically touch the sidewalk.
What you should say: "You know, the full front porch and high-gabled roof are a distinct blend of Caribbean and French-Canadian design; interesting combo, don't you think?"

American Townhouse

Where you'll see it: Central Business District or Lower Garden District. Look for a narrow brick or stucco three-story structure, asymmetrical windows and an iron balcony on the second or third floor.
What you should say: "See all that fine iron detailing on the balcony? The intricate ornamentation style is pre-Civil War."

Creole Townhouse

Where you'll see it: French Quarter. With shops below and homes above, these buildings are the perfect arrangement for the thriving urban center. Arched windows distinguish Creole from American townhouses.
What you should say: "After the great fires of 1788 and 1794 torched most freestanding homes in this district, these brick and stuccoed-brick structures emerged with strong Spanish influences."

Raised Centerhall Cottage

Where you'll see it: Garden District, Uptown or Carrollton. Keep an eye out for the one-and-a-half-story homes raised slightly above street-level and a porch stretching all the way across the front with columns.
What you should say: "I don't know if you know this, but these homes are basically urbanized version of French-Colonial plantations."

Shotgun House

Where you'll see it: Throughout the city. These are plentiful and easy to spot - long and narrow single-story homes with lacey Victorian embellishment beneath the large front eve.
What you should say: "The term shotgun originates from the hypothetical theory that if all the interior doors are all open and aligned, you can shoot clear through the house even though there's no hallway."

Double Gallery House

Where you'll see it: Lower Garden District, Garden District, Uptown or Esplanade Ridge. Telltale elements include stacked and covered front porches, stately box columns and a front door off to one side.
What you should say: "Although they look similar to the townhouse styles, these homes built in New Orleans' early suburbs are set back much farther from the sidewalk."

Find more resources on New Orleans architecture at the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans website at prcno.org.

And a Literary Scholar, Too...

In case you need to show off more New Orleans knowledge, here are four key facts about its literary history.

Tennessee Williams - not a native son, but close

The famous playwright, best known for A Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and The Glass Menagerie, was actually born in Mississippi, but New Orleans could safely be called his adopted home.

Inspiration Found Here

Hotel Monteleone was a favorite haunt of Ernest Hemingway, Tennessee Williams and William Faulkner. Truman Capote frequented the Carousel Bar and used to quip that he was born in the hotel.

Pulitzer Prize, Please

Four works written in and about New Orleans have won Pulitzers: Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole, A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams, A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain by Robert Olen Butler and The Optimist's Daughter by Eudora Welty.

Inter-vieux with the Vampire

Anne Rice's novel The Vampire Chronicles takes place in these city streets - just add Brad Pitt for silver-screen magic.